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Immunisation information for children and young people

Annual flu nasal spray

Flu can affect both children and adults; however children can get quite unwell should they catch this. They can sometimes get high fever, achy muscles, painful joints and sometimes breathing difficulties. At times it can also lead to severe complications and may need hospital admission. The flu vaccine is now available in a nasal spray form for children. Preschool children can get it in their GP surgery and school nurses give them for children in primary school in their schools.

The flu vaccine is now available in a nasal form for children and available through the GP for children under 5 years of age and from school nurses in their primary school for children up to year 2.

For more information please watch this video and visit NHS Choices website.

Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) vaccination

Measles, mumps and rubella are common highly infectious viruses, which are airborne and can cause conditions with high temperatures and nasty rash. They can lead to serious complications such as meningitis, swelling of the brain (encephalitis) and deafness.

Children can be protected by having MMR vaccine, which is given at their GP surgery as a single injection. MMR is a safe and effective combined vaccine that protects against these three viruses in a single injection. The full course of MMR vaccination requires two doses. The first jab is usually given within a month of their first birthday and a second jab before starting school, usually between three and five years of age. It's important to make sure your children are up-to-date with the MMR vaccination before starting the school.

For more information please watch this video and visit NHS Choices website.

Immunisation for teenagers

Teenage Booster Vaccines

The teenage booster (known as the 3-in-1 or the Td/IPV vaccine) is given as a single injection to boost the protection against tetanus, diphtheria and polio. This booster jab is given by school nurses at schools to all school children in year 9 or year 10. Meningitis jab is also given at the same time.

For more information please watch this video and visit NHS Choices website.

Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine for girls in Year 8

Cervical cancer is the most common type of cancer for women aged under 35. The HPV jab will give protection against 2 types of HPV which cause 70% of cervical cancer. This vaccination is offered to girls in Year 8 by school nurses through the school. The HPV vaccine is currently given as two injections, the second one is given six months after the first jab.

For more information please watch this video and visit NHS Choices website

Meningitis Jab for all 13 to 19 year olds and new university entrants

A catch–up programme offering MenACWY vaccination to all 13 to 19 year olds and new university entrants was started in August 2015. This is in response to a rapid and accelerating increase in cases of invasive meningococcal group W (MenW) disease. The attached poster is aimed at students who have just entered university from overseas or not directly from school, or missed meningitis vaccine in schools encourages them to get the new MenACWY vaccine to prevent invasive meningococcal disease.

If you are starting university, go to your GP to get the vaccination before you go. If you miss out, you can still register with a GP at University and get the vaccination there. Please contact your GP if you need more information or visit the NHS Choices website  here.

MenACWY A3 poster for new University entrants (pdf)

Last reviewed: 30/09/2016